ALIA Schools Online Forum: Online learning – Day 5

onlinelearningi

ALIA Schools Online Forum: Online learning – Day 5

Today we ask participants to share their top tip for online learning with one another in the comments section.

We also encourage you to continue your exploration from yesterday into different online learning opportunities.

We look forward to reading and engaging with you all in the comments section of this post.

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13 thoughts on “ALIA Schools Online Forum: Online learning – Day 5

  1. I have two tips:
    1. Make sure you keep up with the discussions – if you fall behind it is very hard to catch up and you miss the “in the moment” feedback.
    2. No matter how silly you think your suggestion or answer is still put it up on the discussion board as I have learnt some great things from other participants that we and they have learnt some great ideas from me which I didn’t think were that fantastic!

  2. Block it into your diary – like any other commitment. Otherwise the time slips….you think you will get to it.

    Do it with a team if you can.

    You need to commit to it in the same way as you would a face to face course.

    • Great advice Catherine that I echo. Time does slip away so scheduling is as important as it is with a face-to-face meeting or course. The first course I did online was with our library team and the experience was positive because we supported each other.

  3. “In the Australian Curriculum, students develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability as they learn to use ICT effectively and appropriately to access, create and communicate information and ideas, solve problems and work collaboratively in all learning areas at school and in their lives beyond school. ICT capability involves students learning to make the most of the digital technologies available to them, adapting to new ways of doing things as technologies evolve and limiting the risks to themselves and others in a digital environment.” (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/generalcapabilities/information-and-communication-technology-capability/introduction/introduction)

    Teachers and teacher-librarians can leverage the curriculum, using digital technologies and practices, for online learning, which happens in a ‘digital environment’.
    http://www.acara.edu.au/_resources/General_capabilities_-_ICT_-_learning_continuum.pdf

    Although the term ‘online learning ‘ is not specifically mentioned it is possible to facilitate online learning opportunities across many learning areas in The Australian Curriculum: http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/generalcapabilities/information-and-communication-technology-capability/introduction/in-the-learning-areas

  4. “In the Australian Curriculum, students develop Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability as they learn to use ICT effectively and appropriately to access, create and communicate information and ideas, solve problems and work collaboratively in all learning areas at school and in their lives beyond school. ICT capability involves students learning to make the most of the digital technologies available to them, adapting to new ways of doing things as technologies evolve and limiting the risks to themselves and others in a digital environment.” (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/generalcapabilities/information-and-communication-technology-capability/introduction/introduction)

    Teachers and teacher-librarians can leverage the opportunities afforded in The Australian Curriculum to encourage participatory online learning in a safe ‘digital environment’.

  5. My tips for online learning… hmm… Everybody is different so don’t take the tips as gospel truth. Find your own way, whatever you engage with. Personally, I value ongoing relationships with people I get to know through rich online courses. Usually if the course is open ended and provides an opportunity for unstructured collaborative creativity as I found with #Rhizo15. Based loosely on the writings of Deleuze and Guattari (which most of us only dipped into) I responded to a prompt by writing a tongue in cheek radio play. Then I shared it on a Google doc and everyone added their bits. Someone suggested actually making a radio play, so we took parts, recorded our readings on Soundcloud, shared and someone put it all together. Others jumped in and created posters for the unveiling of the podcast, etc. I was so amazed that people took the time to do these things and it was the best fun I had online. Also resulted in ongoing relationships because we got to know each other through lots of conversations. Of course I also followed these people wherever they were, eg Twitter, Google+, Facebook, etc. because not everyone is on the same platform. These are the people I still engage with. Right now we are sending each other postcards from all over the world because online friends also appreciate hard copy things. Some people are creating their postcards! eg string art, collage, etc. All under the umbrella of #clmooc which many people are involved in. I can usually follow people from one mooc to another. Tip: Do what you can – no guilt! Do what you enjoy! You learn so much.

    • I love the interactions you describe. The unlikely frissons which could not have taken place because of locality. Jumping in and giving it a shot features in your post and look at the relationships you have gained! Awesome.

  6. Hello, My tip/main focus for online learning is to not lose sight of the relationships/people involved. Being online means we often have to work that bit harder/smarter to keep the understanding happening. When people ask me how we do library in an online setting I often say we do all the same things that are done in a f2f library but we sometimes need to add a little tweak to it. We also work hard to make the personal contact happen – even if that is virtually.

    • So true, Sue, that you have to work hard to keep the relationship with the person/people as our main focus. I think the aspect of examining our writing tone, for example, in blog or forum comments, is something we need to teach students explicitly. Tone can be misunderstood in text, and writing positive, constructive comments is also something that needs to be practised, otherwise the student default is often meaningless chat language.

  7. I think my best tip is to not get TOO carried away with enthusiasm about all the online opportunities there are available. I initially got a bit gung-ho when I first started with MOOCs and consequently, there are a few that I’ve not made a LOT of headway with. 😉 Better to select more carefully – as I’ve done since – and really focus on what you’re learning and experiencing – and as others have mentioned, enjoying the interactions with other people where you can. There’s a lot to be learned beyond what’s on the “curriculum”, as it were! 🙂

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